View Post

Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander

In Freshwater, Reptiles and Amphibians, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander, Slough Life by Administrator

Elkhorn Slough Reserve, Cattail Swale, and other freshwater ponds in the watershed SCLTS only live for about 10 years. The coastal terrace along Monterey Bay is a unique terrestrial landscape that provides shelter to one of the rarest vertebrates in North America: the Santa Cruz long-toed salamander (SCLTS). This relictual species was first discovered along Bonita Drive in Aptos in …

View Post

Press Release: Endangered Salamander Breeds in Elkhorn Slough

In Press, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander by Administrator

For immediate release PRESS RELEASE: Endangered Salamander Breeds in Elkhorn Slough July 19, 2011 For the second year in a row the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine research Reserve (ESNERR)’s Freshwater Ecologist Nina D’Amore, PhD, has found evidence of the federally endangered Santa Cruz long-­‐toed salamanders breeding in the Elkhorn Slough watershed. Amphibians like the Santa Cruz long-­‐toed salamander are sensitive to water …

View Post

Press Release: Endangered Santa Cruz Long-Toed Salamander larvae discovered in Elkhorn Slough

In Press, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander by Administrator

PRESS RELEASE Elkhorn Slough Foundation Contact: (updated contact Kerstin Wasson) For immediate release June 3, 2010 Endangered Santa Cruz Long-Toed Salamander larvae discovered in Elkhorn Slough The first finding of larvae at the Reserve since 2006 bodes well for salamander’s future Watsonville, CA- Researchers made an exciting discovery of several Santa Cruz long-toed salamander larvae in a pond at the Elkhorn …

View Post

Science in Action: Threatened Amphibians of Elkhorn Slough

In California red-legged frog, Freshwater, Reptiles and Amphibians, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander, Science in Action Article by Administrator

October 2004 by Kerstin Wasson, ESNERR Reseach Coordinator In the past years, we have documented a dramatic decline in California Red-legged Frog (CRLF) populations on the Reserve. On summer nights at the end of the last millennium, the eyeshine of hundreds of CRLF could be seen in the beam of a flashlight, and the waters teemed with their tadpole young. …